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Massachusetts Attorney Fees Must be Reasonable

A case having authority in Massachusetts was recently decided by the 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, sitting in Boston. All Massachusetts attorney fee agreements must be reasonable, the Court said. Further, Court held that this includes contingent fee agreements. Massachusetts attorneys cannot charge too much for their services in light of the actual work performed. The Boston attorneys at the Law Office of Neil Burns are always up front regarding costs and fees, and they respect the fact that it is your money that fuels and drives your case.
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Boston Lawyer Suspended — Bad Legal Advice

The Boston office of the Bar Counsel recommended a Boston attorney loss his license to practice law for one year and one day, and the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court agreed. Massachusetts lawyers are barred from sharing fees with, and assisting non-lawyers in the practice of law. The Boston attorneys at the Law Office of Neil Burns provide direct, one-on-one representation to all their clients.
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The Risk in Representing Yourself

There are many attorneys in Boston. But sometimes, in lieu of consulting and hiring an experienced attorney, many Massachusetts residents try to navigate the Massachusetts court system on their own. The attorneys at the Boston Law Office of Neil Burns know that this is often a mistake. Trying to represent yourself, whether in court or when dealing with insurance companies, for example, in negotiating personal injury settlements, can be tricky; worse yet, your claim may not survive.
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Getting in Touch with Your Massachusetts Attorney

The Massachusetts Board of Bar Overseers, sitting in Boston, issued the following ruling regarding a licensed Massachusetts attorney on May 3, 2010. The ruling involved an attorney not responding to a client and failing to pursue a client’s claim with diligence. The Boston attorney’s at the Law Office of Neil Burns field repeated inquiries regarding potential attorney malpractice and attorney’s responsibility to their clients. This case of discipline is an example of the requirements Boston and all Massachusetts attorneys must follow with respect to their clients.
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Boston Area Attorneys Suspended for Failing to Fully Represent Client

Two Boston area attorneys were temporarily suspended when, according to the Lawrence, Massachusetts court, they “put their self interest ahead of that of the client.” Ferreira, Pedro (Lawyers Weekly No. 25-010-10) (April 8, 2010). This was a worker’s compensation case involving the Department of Industrial Accidents, and Boston legal malpractice attorney Neil Burns has represented hundreds of clients in cases where an attorney did not put the client’s best interest first.
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Massachusetts Attorney Nissenbum Ordered to Return $328,771 in Attorney Fees

Legal malpractice is when an attorney breaches his or her duty to the client causing damages. Overbilling, on the other hand, is often considered the cousin of legal malpractice. In a recent notorious case, Judge Stephen Steinberg of the Probate and Family Court, issued a 33 page detailed decision criticizing Massachusetts attorneys Gerald Nissenbaum and James Vera for billing an estate almost $500,000.
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Legal Malpractice in Massachusetts Requires Duty Owed

In a case handed down by the US District Court, legal malpractice actions were clarified. The Court reaffirmed that there must be an attorney client relationship: an “implied” attorney client relationship is not valid, nor is there any “duty” owed to a non client. One of the fundamental aspects to any legal malpractice claim is that the lawyer owed a duty to the client. In the United States District Court decision, the Court held that because the defendant lawyers never owed any “duty” to the plaintiff, they could not be responsible for committing legal malpractice.
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